Last edited by Dishura
Monday, May 18, 2020 | History

4 edition of Terrorism in the United States and the potential threat to nuclear facilities found in the catalog.

Terrorism in the United States and the potential threat to nuclear facilities

by Bruce Hoffman

  • 131 Want to read
  • 38 Currently reading

Published by Rand in Santa Monica, CA .
Written in English

    Places:
  • United States.,
  • United States
    • Subjects:
    • Terrorism -- United States.,
    • Nuclear terrorism -- United States.,
    • Subversive activities -- United States.,
    • Nuclear weapons -- United States -- Safety measures.

    • Edition Notes

      StatementBruce Hoffman ; prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy.
      ContributionsUnited States. Dept. of Energy., Rand Corporation.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHV6432 .H64 1986
      The Physical Object
      Paginationix, 56 p. ;
      Number of Pages56
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL2707966M
      ISBN 100833006940
      LC Control Number86000492

        United States House of Representatives Detecting and Neutralizing Potential Terrorist Threats and update of the threat or potential threat to U.S. nuclear facilities .   The New York Times reported last week on a U.S. government report accusing Russia of conducting a series of cyberattacks aimed at U.S. and European nuclear power plants and water and electric systems from through In addition to attacks on water and electric plants, publicly available evidence suggests that Russia infiltrated the business systems of the Burlington, Kan., Wolf .

      General Info about Terrorism Are You Ready? Terrorism is the use of force or violence against persons or property in violation of the criminal laws of the United States for purposes of intimidation, coercion, or ransom. Terrorists often use threats to: • Create fear among the public. Theft or diversion of Russian nuclear weapons for terrorist use may represent a significant near-term threat to the United States, especially the theft or diversion of smaller, manportable weapons. Table and the classified annex provide additional details on these threats. 3.

      Nuclear terrorism. Nuclear terrorism refers to any person or persons who detonate a nuclear weapon in an act of terrorism (meaning illegal or immoral use of violence for a political or religious cause). Some definitions of nuclear terrorism include the sabotage of a nuclear facility and/or the detonation of a radiological device, colloquially termed a dirty bomb, but consensus is lacking.   South Africa voluntarily dismantled its nuclear weapons. The number of weapons in the United States and Russia has dropped significantly since the height of the Cold War—through diplomacy and cooperation. More than 50 countries have participated in head-of-state-level Nuclear Security Summits to prevent nuclear terrorism.


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Terrorism in the United States and the potential threat to nuclear facilities by Bruce Hoffman Download PDF EPUB FB2

Present terrorist threat to nuclear weapons facilities, the situation must always be considered in a state of flux, with the possibility of sudden changes in the future. One problem in assessing the terrorist threat posed to nuclear weapons programs and facilities is that, in the absence of actual terror­.

Terrorism in the United States and the Potential Threat to Nuclear Facilities This report examines the threat posed by terrorists to U.S. nuclear weapons production and research facilities. Get this from a library. Terrorism in the United States and the potential threat to nuclear facilities.

[Bruce Hoffman; United States. Department of Energy.; Rand Corporation.] -- "This report examines the threat posed by terrorists to U.S. nuclear weapons production and research facilities. It identifies and reviews the activities of three classes of terrorist groups in the.

Nuclear terrorism encompasses a spectrum of threats--the detonation of a nuclear bomb, an attack on a civil nuclear installation, or the dispersal of radiological materials through a "dirty bomb." Each differs in probability and consequence. In the post-Soviet era, as the number of nuclear states has increased and governmental control over nuclear stockpiles has weakened, the threat of nuclear terrorism has become a growing concern of the global community.

By examining whether terrorists will 'go nuclear,' RAND's analyses have helped policymakers understand the probable risk and potential sources of nuclear terrorism. Of all the terrorist threats facing the United States and the world, perhaps the gravest is the possibility of terrorists constructing or obtaining a nuclear weapon and detonating it in a city.

If a terrorist group exploded just one nuclear weapon, hundreds of thousands of people could die. The accident at Fukushima was a wake-up call reminding the world of the vulnerability of nuclear power plants to natural disasters such as earthquakes and floods.

However, nature is not the only potential threat to nuclear facilities. They are also inviting targets for sabotage and terrorist attacks. October By Kenneth C. Brill and John H. Berhard Lack of knowledge is not an impediment to nuclear terrorism.

Lack of nuclear material is. Information on how to manipulate nuclear material to produce an explosive device—an improvised nuclear device, which would produce a nuclear explosion and a mushroom cloud, or a radiation-dispersal device, which would spread dangerous radioactive.

The United States faces a rising danger from terrorists and rogue states seeking to use weapons of mass destruction. A weapon of mass destruction is a nuclear, radiological, chemical, biological, or other device that is intended to harm a large number of people.

Nuclear terrorism shares much in common with other terrorist threats--and as a result, he argues, defeating it is impossible unless we put our entire counterterrorism and homeland security house.

Even before the attack on the World Trade Center, the threat of nuclear terrorism was well recognised by the US Department of Energy, which warned: “The most urgent unmet national security threat to the United States today is the danger that weapons of mass destruction or weapons useable material in Russia could be stolen and sold to.

Today, our focus is on nuclear proliferation and the potential threat of nuclear terrorism in Asia and the Pacific — and I am pleased at the opportunity to share with you my perspectives on the challenges we face, and how the IAEA is working to strengthen nuclear security and the nuclear.

Further, Iran has so far refused to enter into any negotiations on its nuclear program until the E3+3 countries (the U.S., U.K., China, France, Germany and Russia) agree to lift all sanctions and Author: Larry Bell.

The issue of how concerned American citizens and the United States government should be with the threat of nuclear terrorism has been the subject of vigorous debate in the almost eleven years since the terrorist attacks of Septem   On Nuclear Terrorism confronts what many argue is the greatest national security threat we face: terrorist groups armed with nuclear weapons.

In contrast with most writing on. Protecting the United States from terrorism is the founding mission of the Department of Homeland Security.

While America is stronger and more resilient as a result of a strengthened homeland security enterprise, threats from terrorism persist and continue to evolve. Homeland security starts with hometown security—and we all have a role to play. Nuclear terrorism is perceived as one of the most immediate and extreme threats to global security today.

While the international community has made important progress in securing fissile material, there are still important steps to be made with nearly 2, metric tons of weapons-usable nuclear material spread around the by: 3. @article{osti_, title = {Terrorism and global security: The nuclear threat, second edition}, author = {Beres, L.R.}, abstractNote = {A two-part analysis devoted to the understanding and prevention of nuclear terrorism, this updated study focuses on the threat of nuclear technology in light of the potential use of nuclear armaments or radioactivity by insurgent groups.

A Terrorism Threat at Nuclear Plants The United States nuclear industry’s multilayered security measures — including armed security. Terrorist attacks like the ones we experienced on Septem have left many concerned about the possibility of future incidents of terrorism in the United States and their potential impact.

They have raised uncertainty about what might happen next, increasing stress levels. Nuclear terrorism is perceived as one of the most immediate and extreme threats to global security today.

While the international community has made important progress in securing fissile material, there are still important steps to be made with nearly 2, metric tons of weapons-usable nuclear material spread around the : $Nuclear terrorism is perceived as one of the most immediate and extreme threats to global security today.

While the international community has made important progress in securing fissile material, there are still important steps to be made with nearly 2, metric tons of weapons-usable nuclear material spread around the globe.On Saturday in St.

Petersburg, Presidents Bush and Putin announced the Global Initiative to Combat Nuclear Terrorism, an effort that will establish a partnership among nations committed to developing their individual and collective capabilities to detect and defeat the most dangerous threat we face – nuclear weapons in the hands of a terrorist.